Tuesday, 14 October 2014

Type 1 Diabetes: Let me manage my condition

I've spent the past few days working on some type 1 diabetes cards, at the request of a group of parents of children with the condition.

I knew little about the condition, but as I read through the parents requests I realised that actually, the condition might be different, but the communication problems were the same. Assumptions and disbelief. And well intentioned things which REALLY don't help - even trying to force me to do something which I know I can't. These are barriers that I have encountered - and ones which I know the stickman keyring cards can help break down.

The scenarios described, like people not believing that a child with diabetes could enjoy the food at a birthday party, and simply taking their plate from them. Or assuming that they caused their condition through an unhealthy lifestyle etc were not ones which I had experienced personally, but they resonated with my experiences - and next thing I know I've finished the drafts in 2 days rather than the week I had planned!

So here are the drafts:
The text for the first one isn't easy to read in this image, so I've copied it here:
"I have Type 1 Diabetes, a life-long condition where my body can’t regulate my blood glucose levels. It is not caused by diet or lifestyle, but an autoimmune reaction destroying my insulin-producing cells. I don’t have to follow a special diet, but I do have to take varying amounts of insulin. Treating episodes of high or low blood sugar immediately is really important for my long term health so I may need to check blood glucose, inject insulin or eat a sugary snack. Please don’t ask me to leave, but let me treat my condition wherever I am. Any delay will make things worse. I know what to do. It is my normal." 
(each card is 110x80mm, laminated, durable plastic, and come on a keyring.)

As I once heard someone comment, the keyring cards aren't for people who can't speak, so much as for people who won't listen.

A way to state requirements with confidence - and in a way which people accept far more easily than when spoken, and are equally effective with both adults and children. I'm still not sure why. Perhaps it is because they are professionally printed and official looking. But I wonder if Terry Pratchett was right when he wrote "Laughter helps things slide into the thinking."

And while discussing the cards with one of the parents I realised that one particular aspect of their treatment was very familiar. For several months (or possibly years, I can't remember!) I had to inject myself 3 times a day. And sometimes I really wanted to say "actually, I need it NOW and don't have then energy to waste getting to somewhere 'private' just to make you feel 'better' about a young person needing injected medication!" - so it became a more general 'injections' card.


So if you have any feedback, suggested improvements or errors spotted, please let me know by this Thursday - as I will be sending them off to the printers then :)